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Zoom Madness, Media, and Mass Marketing
 A majority of people have a pessimistic view toward mental illness and we can see how erratic behavior isn’t easily tolerated. When you say that someone has a mental illness, you begin labeling them followed by stating the specific illness they have. This can frighten the person many times and they then begin thinking they have some sort of “disease”. That is what we call the ‘labeling theory’ — once someone is given a label, in time they become that person. Often times these labels can be misleading and both frighten and worry the person which causes them a lot of harm in the long run. The label applied to the illness becomes almost as damaging as the illness itself. Instead, these people need words of encouragement.
 Mental illness is not a “thing” – like a specimen in a museum – for which a label much be found. It is rather a state of functioning, a way of behaving. When we label people as either a psychotic or a psychopath, it sounds degrading. This gloomy prognosis of a person means something despised through the use of these damning words. We have to be careful of how we speak about mental illness. Many of the words that psychiatrists choose to use are in fact dangerous. They misrepresent mental illness and therefore permit the public to have a pessimistic view of mental illness.
 We have to be careful in the ways we label someone as being insane or mentally ill. A lot of people don’t actually lose their minds. They may just be extremely stressed, confused, or anxious. It would be plain demoralizing to give them a diagnosis such as i.e. manic-depressive. A good psychiatrist has to help the patient have a clear mind at the end of their session no matter what kind of disjointed or ludicrous problems and thoughts they may have. Public attitudes toward mental illness are negative due to the social influence. People are afraid of anyone that deviates from the norms that society wants them to uphold but we have to be aware of the fine line between mental illness and insanity.
 For example :  
“The Mega-Marketing of Depression in Japan” by Watters
  Regarding Kirmayer’s presentation to the GlaxoSmithKline drug company, cultural beliefs about depression are easily malleable in response to messages that are exported from one culture to another. Kirmayer believes that the drug company representatives are interested in changing the notions of depression in Japan to those of the Western hemisphere. In the globalizing world, the cultural conceptions surrounding illnesses such as depression could be influenced and shifted over time. The drug companies were solely interested in standardizing the diagnosis of depression psychiatry around the world. By standardizing the diagnosis criteria of illnesses like depression, drug companies were believed to be able to provide additional advances and accurate diagnoses in psychiatry, and in return receive huge profits.
However, the notion of other cultures and their unique expressions, descriptions, and understanding of different ‘states of beings’ would die out. This reshaping of a population or culture can possibly kill diversity as certain categories of depression in the United States don’t equally fit well everywhere around the world, including Japan. The one-size-fits all notion of depression is what the drug company representatives believed they could successfully achieve through this “mega-marketing” campaign of depression in Japan. 

Madness, Media, and Mass Marketing

A majority of people have a pessimistic view toward mental illness and we can see how erratic behavior isn’t easily tolerated. When you say that someone has a mental illness, you begin labeling them followed by stating the specific illness they have. This can frighten the person many times and they then begin thinking they have some sort of “disease”. That is what we call the ‘labeling theory’ — once someone is given a label, in time they become that person. Often times these labels can be misleading and both frighten and worry the person which causes them a lot of harm in the long run. The label applied to the illness becomes almost as damaging as the illness itself. Instead, these people need words of encouragement.

Mental illness is not a “thing” – like a specimen in a museum – for which a label much be found. It is rather a state of functioning, a way of behaving. When we label people as either a psychotic or a psychopath, it sounds degrading. This gloomy prognosis of a person means something despised through the use of these damning words. We have to be careful of how we speak about mental illness. Many of the words that psychiatrists choose to use are in fact dangerous. They misrepresent mental illness and therefore permit the public to have a pessimistic view of mental illness.

We have to be careful in the ways we label someone as being insane or mentally ill. A lot of people don’t actually lose their minds. They may just be extremely stressed, confused, or anxious. It would be plain demoralizing to give them a diagnosis such as i.e. manic-depressive. A good psychiatrist has to help the patient have a clear mind at the end of their session no matter what kind of disjointed or ludicrous problems and thoughts they may have. Public attitudes toward mental illness are negative due to the social influence. People are afraid of anyone that deviates from the norms that society wants them to uphold but we have to be aware of the fine line between mental illness and insanity.

For example : 

“The Mega-Marketing of Depression in Japan” by Watters

Regarding Kirmayer’s presentation to the GlaxoSmithKline drug company, cultural beliefs about depression are easily malleable in response to messages that are exported from one culture to another. Kirmayer believes that the drug company representatives are interested in changing the notions of depression in Japan to those of the Western hemisphere. In the globalizing world, the cultural conceptions surrounding illnesses such as depression could be influenced and shifted over time. The drug companies were solely interested in standardizing the diagnosis of depression psychiatry around the world. By standardizing the diagnosis criteria of illnesses like depression, drug companies were believed to be able to provide additional advances and accurate diagnoses in psychiatry, and in return receive huge profits.

However, the notion of other cultures and their unique expressions, descriptions, and understanding of different ‘states of beings’ would die out. This reshaping of a population or culture can possibly kill diversity as certain categories of depression in the United States don’t equally fit well everywhere around the world, including Japan. The one-size-fits all notion of depression is what the drug company representatives believed they could successfully achieve through this “mega-marketing” campaign of depression in Japan. 

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Earl Woods, Tiger Woods’ deceased father asks his son a few questions before Tiger’s return to golf. 

One of the most sentimental advertisements I’ve seen. GO NIKE!

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The most creative youtube ad I’ve ever seen. This is actually an ad for Tipp-Ex, a correction fluid.The ad is a new type of interactive video introduced recently by YouTube in which the site along with the video become part of the ad. In this case, users are asked to create their own videos with what they want to see. This interactive youtube video is originally titled “A hunter shoots a bear,” but users can replace “shoots” with anything they want and videos are shown of almost anything you can think of. FUN, FUN, FUN!

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Zoom February 14, 2011, 
"Barbie you’re the only doll for me"
They may be plastic but their love is real. A cute digital campaign launched by Mattel on Valentine’s day aiming to reunite Barbie and Ken after their split in 2004. Can you say A-D-O-R-A-B-L-E?!

February 14, 2011,

"Barbie you’re the only doll for me"

They may be plastic but their love is real. A cute digital campaign launched by Mattel on Valentine’s day aiming to reunite Barbie and Ken after their split in 2004. Can you say A-D-O-R-A-B-L-E?!


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Dove: UNDER PRESSURE

There are many advertisements out there today that show young girls and women unrealistic ideas of what beautiful is and what it’s supposed to be. Unlike a lot of companies in the media today, Dove is looking to change the demented beauty standards we have. Dove, a personal care brand offering products such as deodorants, body washes, lotions, moisturizers, hair care, facial care products, and varieties of beauty bar soaps has an outstanding advertising campaign. They are trying to change these unrealistic beauty standards through their worldwide “Real Beauty” campaign launched back in 2004. This marketing campaign was done in an assortment of forms which included advertisements, videos, workshops, and events.

There are many advertisements out there today that show young girls and women unrealistic ideas of what beautiful is and what it’s supposed to be. Unlike a lot of companies in the media today, Dove is looking to change the demented beauty standards we have. Dove, a personal care brand offering products such as deodorants, body washes, lotions, moisturizers, hair care, facial care products, and varieties of beauty bar soaps has an outstanding advertising campaign. They are trying to change these unrealistic beauty standards through their worldwide “Real Beauty” campaign launched back in 2004. This marketing campaign was done in an assortment of forms which included advertisements, videos, workshops, and events.

The campaign featured normal women on billboards of different shapes and sizes. It was shot by a fashion photographer using ordinary-looking people instead of models. They went away from the “Supermodel” looks to look at real beauty with their advertisements because women used in most advertisements and commercials are not real everyday women. Dove wanted to put women on billboards that were “fat” and “old” because that is “real beauty”. The beauty they’re looking for is within people’s imperfections. If you walk down a New York City street, you will see real individuals, not numerous perfect women. That is why Dove’s “Real Beauty” campaign used one of the smartest ideas ever which was to challenge the usual supermodel image.

Why is this advertisement effective?

1. Informative to the viewer

2. Successfully promoted the product

3. Persuasive to the viewer

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Zoom David LaChapelle’s "Inflatable Wonderbread" photo
They say a picture is worth a thousand words and this one reflects America’s obesity epidemic.

David LaChapelle’s "Inflatable Wonderbread" photo

They say a picture is worth a thousand words and this one reflects America’s obesity epidemic.

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“We all die. The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will.”
— Chuck Palahniuk
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Zoom BEAUTY DOESN’T HAVE TO BE DEFINED BY THE SIZE OF ONE’S JEANS
This is a banned advertisement made by The Body Shop of Ruby, an anti-Barbie spokesperson. This banned advertisement was forbidden to be hung up as complaints of overexposure and nudity were uttered in both the US and China.
Challenging the usual supermodel image:
A lot of advertising today has damaged beauty standards. The media has created unrealistic standards of what “beautiful” is and spread it all over like Swine Flu. Not only do individuals accept these unrealistic commercials but they also have adapted this new corrupt concept of what beautiful is. Today’s advertisements constantly provide viewers with women who fit this new idea of “bodily perfection”. These females comprise of perfect flat stomachs, skin, hair, and height which cause negative psychological effects, especially in young females. Even though it’s a known fact that the supermodels used in ads are extremely photo-shopped, the idea of what beauty is has stuck with the entire world.
These days, if a woman is not the size of a toothpick she is automatically labeled “fat” because she doesn’t look like the perfect girls used in the advertisements. These unrealistic standards of beauty need to be stopped because they put a tremendous amount of pressure on women. The advertisements using these perfect women are causing real women to be more self-conscious about their bodies and looks than they already were. It also takes away the excitement to actually purchase the product being offered in the first place. Advertisements are so wrapped up in the supermodel putting on a show these days that viewers can’t tell whether they’re offering a product or an eating disorder.

BEAUTY DOESN’T HAVE TO BE DEFINED BY THE SIZE OF ONE’S JEANS

This is a banned advertisement made by The Body Shop of Ruby, an anti-Barbie spokesperson. This banned advertisement was forbidden to be hung up as complaints of overexposure and nudity were uttered in both the US and China.

Challenging the usual supermodel image:

A lot of advertising today has damaged beauty standards. The media has created unrealistic standards of what “beautiful” is and spread it all over like Swine Flu. Not only do individuals accept these unrealistic commercials but they also have adapted this new corrupt concept of what beautiful is. Today’s advertisements constantly provide viewers with women who fit this new idea of “bodily perfection”. These females comprise of perfect flat stomachs, skin, hair, and height which cause negative psychological effects, especially in young females. Even though it’s a known fact that the supermodels used in ads are extremely photo-shopped, the idea of what beauty is has stuck with the entire world.

These days, if a woman is not the size of a toothpick she is automatically labeled “fat” because she doesn’t look like the perfect girls used in the advertisements. These unrealistic standards of beauty need to be stopped because they put a tremendous amount of pressure on women. The advertisements using these perfect women are causing real women to be more self-conscious about their bodies and looks than they already were. It also takes away the excitement to actually purchase the product being offered in the first place. Advertisements are so wrapped up in the supermodel putting on a show these days that viewers can’t tell whether they’re offering a product or an eating disorder.


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Zoom  
Left brain: I am the left brain. I am a scientist. A mathematician. I love the familiar. I categorize. I am accurate. Linear. Analytical. Strategic. I am practical. Always in control. A master of words and language. Realistic. I calculate equations and play with numbers. I am order. I am logic. I know exactly who I am.
Right brain: I am the right brain. I am creativity. A free spirit. I am passion. Yearning. Sensuality. I am the sound of roaring laughter. I am taste. The feeling of sand beneath bare feat. I am movement. Vivid colors. I am the urge to paint on an empty canvas. I am boundless imagination. Art. Poetry. I sense. I feel. I am everything I wanted to be.
I personally really like this copy for a Mercedes-Benz print ad. I like how there is a lot of print and little branding going on in this ad. The print enables the reader to tie in with the ad as it appeals to every single individual. You are able to find yourself a place just by looking at the ad - where you sit back and wonder “Am I the left or right brain?”. I also like how the right and left brain are so distinctive, in the way the print puts it out. There are many nouns, verbs, and adjectives being used to describe each particular side of the brain. Both the visual and the linguistic idea go together in the ad. These opposite sides compliment one another, even though the descriptive words used under each side are different. If you pay close attention to all of the words as a whole, not looking at just the left or right side — you can see how Mercedes-Benz places itself as the best of the best as it encompasses the best of both worlds. With all of these different “labeling” words, metaphors, etc. , one can associate themselves with the Mercedes brand without having to look at a picture of an actual car. I think it’s very interesting how the words draw the reader in deeper in this ad. 

Left brain: I am the left brain. I am a scientist. A mathematician. I love the familiar. I categorize. I am accurate. Linear. Analytical. Strategic. I am practical. Always in control. A master of words and language. Realistic. I calculate equations and play with numbers. I am order. I am logic. I know exactly who I am.

Right brain: I am the right brain. I am creativity. A free spirit. I am passion. Yearning. Sensuality. I am the sound of roaring laughter. I am taste. The feeling of sand beneath bare feat. I am movement. Vivid colors. I am the urge to paint on an empty canvas. I am boundless imagination. Art. Poetry. I sense. I feel. I am everything I wanted to be.

I personally really like this copy for a Mercedes-Benz print ad. I like how there is a lot of print and little branding going on in this ad. The print enables the reader to tie in with the ad as it appeals to every single individual. You are able to find yourself a place just by looking at the ad - where you sit back and wonder “Am I the left or right brain?”. I also like how the right and left brain are so distinctive, in the way the print puts it out. There are many nouns, verbs, and adjectives being used to describe each particular side of the brain. Both the visual and the linguistic idea go together in the ad. These opposite sides compliment one another, even though the descriptive words used under each side are different. If you pay close attention to all of the words as a whole, not looking at just the left or right side — you can see how Mercedes-Benz places itself as the best of the best as it encompasses the best of both worlds. With all of these different “labeling” words, metaphors, etc. , one can associate themselves with the Mercedes brand without having to look at a picture of an actual car. I think it’s very interesting how the words draw the reader in deeper in this ad. 

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All the things we like as human beings are either immoral, illegal, or fattening.
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